Repertory

bolero BOLERO (2002)
Length: 16 minutes
Music: Maurice Ravel, “Bolero”
Lighting: David Finley
Costumes: Russ Vogler
Set: Harry Feiner

MORE INFO

Learn more about BOLERO:

Bolero is a bold interpretation of the famous musical score by Maurice Ravel, using perpetual motion and ever-changing patterns in the choreography as Ravel did with his score.

Themes for DanceREACH programming
Often integrated with math curriculum.
Appropriate for any age.

  • Exploration of patterns, formations, repeating sequences, by artistically looking at addition, multiplication, division, and geometry
  • Problem-solving
  • Working collaboratively
  • Ravel’s legacy and historical relevance

Contact edu@rioult.org for more information.


CITY (2010)
Length: 15 minutes
Music: J. S. Bach, “Sonata for Violin and Piano #6 in G major”
Lighting: David Finley
Costumes: Karen Young
Projection Design: Brian Clifford Beasley

MORE INFO

City, set to “Sonata for Violin and Piano #6 in G major” by J.S. Bach, was inspired by the way millions of people live in a big city – how they interact with each other and how the buildings that surround take on life and character. The scenic design of urban images and buildings change, distort, and deconstruct as the dancers move happily and frantically, together and alone, unfolding their daily lives.

Themes for DanceREACH programming
Often integrated with social studies curriculum.
Appropriate for any age.

  • The art of everyday movement
  • Concept of the Individual vs. the Group
  • Understanding differences in personalities and relationships
  • Bach’s legacy and historical relevance

Contact edu@rioult.org for more information.


DREAM SUITE (2014)
Length: 12 minutes
Music: Peter I. Tchaikovsky, “Orchestra Suite No. 2 in c Major”
Lighting: Jim French
Costumes: Karen Young
Masks: Anne Posluszny

MORE INFO

Dream Suite is a contemporary take on romanticism. The contrasting mood of Tchaikovsky’s “Orchestral Suite No. 2 in C Major” is juxtaposed with more aggressive, rhythmic and athletic movement. The palette is inspired by the paintings of Marc Chagall and this thoroughly contemporary work delves into surreal as it evolves.

Themes of DanceREACH programming
Often integrated with literature arts, and/or art history curriculum.
Appropriate for elementary, middle and high school programming.

  • Imagination, storytelling
  • Exploring inspiration though other art forms and artistli>
  • Concept of Romanticism vs Surrealism
  • Concept of musical forms of a march and waltz li>
  • Tchaikovsky’s legacy and historical relevance

Contact edu@rioult.org for more information.


FABLES (1997 / 2012)
Length: Varies based on number of sections performed; up to 45 minutes
Music: Bruce Sales / Paul Salerni, “Fables”
Lighting: David Finley / adapted by Pascal Rioult
Costumes: Russ Vogler / Pilar Limosner
Set: Harry Feiner

MORE INFO

Based on Jean de La Fontaine’s “Fables,” this family-friendly dance work depicts select stories such as the Crow and the Fox, the Tortoise and the Hare, and the Ant and the Grasshopper. The dance is set to music by Paul Salerni.

Themes of DanceREACH programming
Often integrated with literature arts curriculum.
Appropriate for elementary and middle school programming.

  • Jean de La Fontaine’s fables
  • Moral of a story
  • Cultural values that stories imply
  • What it means to be a composer
  • Composer and choreographer collaboration

Contact edu@rioult.org for more information.


SMALL STEPS, TINY REVOLUTIONS (2008)
Length: 23 minutes
Music: Steven Sametz, “Small Steps, Tiny Revolutions”
Lighting: David Finley
Costumes: Drew Francis
Sets: Drew Francis

MORE INFO

Small Steps, Tiny Revolutions, set to an original score by Steven Sametz, tells the story of a young boy and his estranged father, based on a poem by Deborah Sacarakis. The boy’s forbidden desire to dance leads him into a fantastic, imaginary land of the shapes and as his father journeys to find him the transforming power of love comes to light.

Themes for DanceREACH programming
Often integrated with literature arts curriculum.
Appropriate for elementary and middle school programming.

  • Imagination
  • Storytelling through dance (comparison to TV, film, books, etc.)
  • What it means to be a composer
  • Composer and choreographer collaboration

Contact edu@rioult.org for more information.


VIEWS OF THE FLEETING WORLD (2008)
Length: 25 minutes
Music: J.S. Bach, “The Art of Fugue”
Lighting: David Finley
Costumes: Karen Young
Projection Design: Harry Feiner
Projection Animation: Brian Clifford Beasley

MORE INFO

This dance is a series of “dreams’ or “meditations” on time and life set to J.S. Bach’s “The Art of Fugue.” The woodcut prints of the Japanese master Hiroshige (a series that was also titled Views of the Fleeting World) inspired Pascal Rioult’s work – the set, the costumes, the color palettem, and the content of the choreography. The dance is composed of nine short vignettes: “Orchard,” “Gathering Storm,” “Wild Horses,” “Dusk, Rain,” “Night Ride,” “Summer Wind,” “Moonlight,” and “Flowing River.”

Themes for DanceREACH programming
Often integrated with literature arts, and/or social studies curriculum.
Appropriate for elementary, middle and high school programming.

  • Exploring inspiration through other art forms and artists
  • Integrating different cultures
  • The relationship between nature and art
  • Concept of the musical form of the fugue (fugere: to flee, to run away from) and the counterpoint
  • Bach’s legacy and historical relevance

Contact edu@rioult.org for more information.


WIEN (1995)
Length: 13 minutes
Music: Maurice Ravel, “La Valse*”
Lighting: David Finley
Costumes: Russ Vogler

MORE INFO

Wien, set to Ravel’s “La Valse,” takes the Viennese waltz – the very image of social refinement – and deconstructs it into a symbol of a disintegrating society struggling with war and hardship.

Themes for DanceREACH programming
Often integrated with social studies curriculum.
Appropriate for 8th grade and up.

  • Impact of war on society
  • Concept of the Individual vs. the Group
  • The framework and social implications of the waltz
  • Ravel’s legacy and historical relevance

Contact edu@rioult.org for more information.